Å Read Ï Rough Ride: Behind the Wheel with a Pro Cyclist by Paul Kimmage Ý sustanon.pro

Å Read Ï Rough Ride: Behind the Wheel with a Pro Cyclist by Paul Kimmage Ý There are others informed in cycling who can give a detailed review than I I gave up on cycling after a few rides, it was not the sport for me, but I follow pro racing on television and in magazines It seems so glamorous But I wanted to know what it s really like This book gives you so much insight, if you follow pro cycling you may never see it quite the same way again The glamour is reserved for a very few For guys like Paul, second rate riders if you can call a pro rider second rate , the cycling life has just a quickly passing hint glamour and brief moments of joy but mostly it s a very, very tough slog, not only on the courses themselves but dealing with the other riders.
Paul shows how tightly knit the community of riders is and what he had to put up with as someone who spoke up against doping I think that culture may Just finished it It really draws a straight line connexion between the doping practices of the 1980 s and the later version on steroids doping of the late 90 s and 2000 s They start the new pros off with vitamin injections completely legal, but it gets them used to injecting themselves with stuff that helps them recover and race faster then come the amphetamines, steroids, etc and later HGH, EPO, etc There really is a whole grooming procedure that these guys are put through to get them to the point where they will accept enhancements It may sound sad to say, but this is the book that made me realize I never loved the sport of professional cycling I loved the idea of the sport of professional cycling It s all smoke and mirrors for money s sake and th This book is written by an idealistic Irish national champion who thought to make a career of himself as a professional cyclist What he found out is that system as it exists uses up its riders like disposable cameras He had ambitions of glory or at least success, only to find that his talent is common in the pro ranks What he describes is what it takes to exist as a professional cyclist the wear and tear on the body and the pounding on the psyche Hired as a domestique, his job is to support the big guns, the stars Yet he is compensated on his own personal racing results, which are earned only when he is released from his supporting duties For lesser riders like him, doping is the logical and even professional way of being able to perform His transgressions are minor caffeine suppositories, and trial use of speed, which he discards as just too visible Eventually he drops out of cyclin Exceptional book detailing life as a struggling cyclist Starting with a successful local amateur career he moves to France to ride with a top ranked amateur French team before becoming a low level pro The most FASCINATING part is his description of riding the tour but specifically, the process of withdrawing his second year He s riding well and then hits the wall, starts the internal discussion that he can slow down even when teammates beg him to renter the peloton Then, the realization of shame and tears as he regrets withdrawing It s quite fascinating particularly to riders that know the feeling of being dropped in a group ride Imagine that at the highest level.
There is much in this book but I found the book to lose focus after the original story with chapters of a lost cycling There are others informed in cycling who can give a detailed review than I I gave up on cycling after a few rides, it was not the sport for me, but I follow pro racing on television and in magazines It seems so glamorous But I wanted to know what it s really like This book gives you so much insight, if you follow pro cycling you may never see it quite the same way again The glamour is reserved for a very few For guys like Paul, second rate riders if you can call a pro rider second rate , the cycling life has just a quickly passing hint glamour and brief moments of joy but mostly it s a very, very tough slog, not only on the courses themselves but dealing with the other riders.
Paul shows how tightly knit the community of riders is and what he had to put up with as someone who spoke up against doping I think that culture may Just finished it It really draws a straight line connexion between the doping practices of the 1980 s and the later version on steroids doping of the late 90 s and 2000 s They start the new pros off with vitamin injections completely legal, but it gets them used to injecting themselves with stuff that helps them recover and race faster then come the amphetamines, steroids, etc and later HGH, EPO, etc There really is a whole grooming procedure that these guys are put through to get them to the point where they will accept enhancements It may sound sad to say, but this is the book that made me realize I never loved the sport of professional cycling I loved the idea of the sport of professional cycling It s all smoke and mirrors for money s sake and th This book is written by an idealistic Irish national champion who thought to make a career of himself as a professional cyclist What he found out is that system as it exists uses up its riders like disposable cameras He had ambitions of glory or at least success, only to find that his talent is common in the pro ranks What he describes is what it takes to exist as a professional cyclist the wear and tear on the body and the pounding on the psyche Hired as a domestique, his job is to support the big guns, the stars Yet he is compensated on his own personal racing results, which are earned only when he is released from his supporting duties For lesser riders like him, doping is the logical and even professional way of being able to perform His transgressions are minor caffeine suppositories, and trial use of speed, which he discards as just too visible Eventually he drops out of cyclin Exceptional book detailing life as a struggling cyclist Starting with a successful local amateur career he moves to France to ride with a top ranked amateur French team before becoming a low level pro The most FASCINATING part is his description of riding the tour but specifically, the process of withdrawing his second year He s riding well and then hits the wall, starts the internal discussion that he can slow down even when teammates beg him to renter the peloton Then, the realization of shame and tears as he regrets withdrawing It s quite fascinating particularly to riders that know the feeling of being dropped in a group ride Imagine that at the highest level.
There is much in this book but I found the book to lose focus after the original story with chapters of a lost cycling An Eye Opening Expose Of And A Heart Breaking Lament For Professional CyclingPaul Kimmage S Boyhood Dreams Were Of Cycling Glory Wearing The Yellow Jersey, Cycling The Tour De France, Becoming A National Hero He Knew It Wouldn T Come Easy, But He Was Prepared To Put In The Graft The Dedication Paid Off He Finished Sixth In The World Championships As An Amateur And In , He Turned ProfessionalHe Soon Discovered It Wasn T About Courage, Training Hours Or How Much You Wanted To Win It Was About Gruelling Defeats, Total Exhaustion, And Drugs Drugs That Would Allow You To Finish The Race And Start Another Day Kimmage Ultimately Left The Sport To Write This Book Profoundly Honest And Ground Breaking, Rough Ride Broke The Silence Surrounding The Issue Of Drugs In Sport, And Documents One Man S Love For, And Struggle With, The Complex World Of Professional Cycling A Must read For Any Cyclist CyclistWINNER OF WILLIAM HILL SPORTS BOOK OF THE YEAR



Paul Kimmage

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